policy.h   [plain text]


/* policy.h
   Configuration file for policy decisions.  To be edited on site.

   Copyright (C) 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995 Ian Lance Taylor

   This file is part of the Taylor UUCP package.

   This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
   modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as
   published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the
   License, or (at your option) any later version.

   This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
   WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
   MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
   General Public License for more details.

   You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
   along with this program; if not, write to the Free Software
   Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA  02111-1307, USA.

   The author of the program may be contacted at ian@airs.com.
   */

/* This header file contains macro definitions which must be set by
   each site before compilation.  The first few are system
   characteristics that can not be easily discovered by the
   configuration script.  Most are configuration decisions that must
   be made by the local administrator.  */

/* System characteristics.  */

/* This code tries to use several ANSI C features, including
   prototypes, stdarg.h, the const qualifier and the types void
   (including void * pointers) and unsigned char.  By default it will
   use these features if the compiler defines __STDC__.  If your
   compiler supports these features but does not define __STDC__, you
   should set ANSI_C to 1.  If your compiler does not support these
   features but defines __STDC__ (no compiler should do this, in my
   opinion), you should set ANSI_C to 0.  In most cases (or if you're
   not sure) just leave the line below commented out.  */
/* #define ANSI_C 1 */

/* Set USE_STDIO to 1 if data files should be read using the stdio
   routines (fopen, fread, etc.) rather than the UNIX unbuffered I/O
   calls (open, read, etc.).  Unless you know your stdio is really
   rotten, you should leave this as 1.  */
#define USE_STDIO 1

/* Exactly one of the following macros must be set to 1.  Many modern
   systems support more than one of these choices through some form of
   compilation environment, in which case the setting will depend on
   the compilation environment you use.  If you have a reasonable
   choice between options, I suspect that TERMIO or TERMIOS will be
   more efficient than TTY, but I have not done any head to head
   comparisons.

   If you don't set any of these macros, the code below will guess.
   It will doubtless be wrong on some systems.

   HAVE_BSD_TTY -- Use the 4.2BSD tty routines
   HAVE_SYSV_TERMIO -- Use the System V termio routines
   HAVE_POSIX_TERMIOS -- Use the POSIX termios routines
   */
#define HAVE_BSD_TTY 0
#define HAVE_SYSV_TERMIO 0
#define HAVE_POSIX_TERMIOS 0

/* This code tries to guess which terminal driver to use if you did
   not make a choice above.  It is in this file to make it easy to
   figure out what's happening if something goes wrong.  */

#if HAVE_BSD_TTY + HAVE_SYSV_TERMIO + HAVE_POSIX_TERMIOS == 0
#if HAVE_TERMIOS_H
#undef HAVE_POSIX_TERMIOS
#define HAVE_POSIX_TERMIOS 1
#else /* ! HAVE_TERMIOS_H */
#if HAVE_CBREAK
#undef HAVE_BSD_TTY
#define HAVE_BSD_TTY 1
#else /* ! HAVE_CBREAK */
#undef HAVE_SYSV_TERMIO
#define HAVE_SYSV_TERMIO 1
#endif /* ! HAVE_CBREAK */
#endif /* ! HAVE_TERMIOS_H */
#endif /* HAVE_BSD_TTY + HAVE_SYSV_TERMIO + HAVE_POSIX_TERMIOS == 0 */

/* On some systems a write to a serial port will block even if the
   file descriptor has been set to not block.  File transfer can be
   more efficient if the package knows that a write to the serial port
   will not block; however, if the write does block unexpectedly then
   data loss is possible at high speeds.

   If writes to a serial port always block even when requested not to,
   you should set HAVE_UNBLOCKED_WRITES to 0; otherwise you should set
   it to 1.  In general on System V releases without STREAMS-based
   ttys (e.g., before SVR4) HAVE_UNBLOCKED_WRITES should be 0 and on
   modern systems it should be 1.

   If HAVE_UNBLOCKED_WRITES is set to 1 when it should be 0 you may
   see an unexpectedly large number of transmission errors, or, if you
   have hardware handshaking, transfer times may be lower than
   expected (but then, they always are).  If HAVE_UNBLOCKED_WRITES is
   set to 0 when it should be 1, file transfer will use more CPU time
   than necessary.  If you are unsure, setting HAVE_UNBLOCKED_WRITES
   to 0 should always be safe.  */
#define HAVE_UNBLOCKED_WRITES 1

/* When the code does do a blocking write, it wants to write the
   largest amount of data which the kernel will accept as a single
   unit.  On BSD this is typically the value of OBUFSIZ in
   <sys/tty.h>, usually 100.  On System V before SVR4 this is
   typically the size of a clist, CLSIZE in <sys/tty.h>, which is
   usually 64.  On SVR4, which uses STREAMS-based ttys, 2048 is
   reasonable.  Define SINGLE_WRITE to the correct value for your
   system.  If SINGLE_WRITE is too large, data loss may occur.  If
   SINGLE_WRITE is too small, file transfer will use more CPU time
   than necessary.  If you have no idea, 64 should work on most modern
   systems.  */
#define SINGLE_WRITE 64

/* Some tty drivers, such as those from SCO and AT&T's Unix PC, have a
   bug in the implementation of ioctl() that causes CLOCAL to be
   ineffective until the port is opened a second time.  If
   HAVE_CLOCAL_BUG is set to 1, code will be added to do this second
   open on the port.  Set this if you are getting messages that say
   "Line disconnected" while in the dial chat script after only
   writing the first few characters to the port.  This bug causes the
   resetting of CLOCAL to have no effect, so the "\m" (require
   carrier) escape sequence won't function properly in dialer chat
   scripts.  */
#define	HAVE_CLOCAL_BUG	0

/* On some systems, such as SCO Xenix, resetting DTR on a port
   apparently prevents getty from working on the port, and thus
   prevents anybody from dialing in.  If HAVE_RESET_BUG is set to 1,
   DTR will not be reset when a serial port is closed.  */
#define HAVE_RESET_BUG 0

/* The Sony NEWS reportedly handles no parity by clearing both the odd
   and even parity bits in the sgtty structure, unlike most BSD based
   systems in which no parity is indicated by setting both the odd and
   even parity bits.  Setting HAVE_PARITY_BUG to 1 will handle this
   correctly.  */
#define HAVE_PARITY_BUG 0

#if HAVE_BSD_TTY
#ifdef sony
#undef HAVE_PARITY_BUG
#define HAVE_PARITY_BUG 1
#endif
#endif

/* On Ultrix 4.0, at least, setting CBREAK causes input characters to
   be stripped, regardless of the setting of LPASS8 and LLITOUT.  This
   can be worked around by using the termio call to reset ISTRIP.
   This probably does not apply to any other operating system.
   Setting HAVE_STRIP_BUG to 1 will use this workaround.  */
#define HAVE_STRIP_BUG 0

#if HAVE_BSD_TTY
#ifdef __ultrix__
#ifndef ultrix
#define ultrix
#endif
#endif
#ifdef ultrix
#undef HAVE_STRIP_BUG
#define HAVE_STRIP_BUG 1
#endif
#endif

/* If your system implements full duplex pipes, set
   HAVE_FULLDUPLEX_PIPES to 1.  Everything should work fine if you
   leave it set to 0, but setting it to 1 can be slightly more
   efficient.  */
#define HAVE_FULLDUPLEX_PIPES 0

/* TIMES_TICK is the fraction of a second which times(2) returns (for
   example, if times returns 100ths of a second TIMES_TICK should be
   set to 100).  On a true POSIX system (one which has the sysconf
   function and also has _SC_CLK_TCK defined in <unistd.h>) TIMES_TICK
   may simply be left as 0.  On some systems the environment variable
   HZ is what you want for TIMES_TICK, but on some other systems HZ
   has the wrong value; check the man page.  If you leave this set to
   0, the code will try to guess; it will doubtless be wrong on some
   non-POSIX systems.  If TIMES_TICK is wrong the code may report
   incorrect file transfer times in the statistics file, but on many
   systems times(2) will actually not be used and this value will not
   matter at all.  */
#define TIMES_TICK 0

/* If your system does not support saved set user ID, set
   HAVE_SAVED_SETUID to 0.  However, this is ignored if your system
   has the setreuid function.  Most modern Unixes have one or the
   other.  If your system has the setreuid function, don't worry about
   this define, or about the following discussion.

   If you set HAVE_SAVED_SETUID to 0, you will not be able to use uucp
   to transfer files that the uucp user can not read.  Basically, you
   will only be able to use uucp on world-readable files.  If you set
   HAVE_SAVED_SETUID to 1, but your system does not have saved set
   user ID, uucp will fail with an error message whenever anybody
   other than the uucp user uses it.  */
#define HAVE_SAVED_SETUID 1

/* On some systems, such as 4.4BSD-Lite, NetBSD, the DG Aviion and,
   possibly, the RS/6000, the setreuid function is broken.  It should
   be possible to use setreuid to swap the real and effective user
   ID's, but on some systems it will not change the real user ID (I
   believe this is due to a misreading of the POSIX standard).  On
   such a system you must set HAVE_BROKEN_SETREUID to 1; if you do
   not, you will get error messages from setreuid.  Systems on which
   setreuid exists but is broken pretty much always have saved setuid.  */
#define HAVE_BROKEN_SETREUID 1

/* On a few systems, such as NextStep 3.3, the POSIX macro F_SETLKW is
   defined, but does not work.  On such systems, you must set
   HAVE_BROKEN_SETLKW to 1.  If you do not, uux will hang, or log
   peculiar error messages, every time it is run.  */
#define HAVE_BROKEN_SETLKW 1

/* On the 3B2, and possibly other systems, nap takes an argument in
   hundredths of a second rather than milliseconds.  I don't know of
   any way to test for this.  Set HAVE_HUNDREDTHS_NAP to 1 if this is
   true on your system.  This does not matter if your system does not
   have the nap function.  */
#define HAVE_HUNDREDTHS_NAP 0

/* Set MAIL_PROGRAM to a program which can be used to send mail.  It
   will be used for mail to both local and remote users.  Set
   MAIL_PROGRAM_TO_BODY to 1 if the recipient should be specified as a
   To: line in the body of the message; otherwise, the recipient will
   be provided as an argument to MAIL_PROGRAM.  Set
   MAIL_PROGRAM_SUBJECT_BODY if the subject should be specified as a
   Subject: line in the body of the message; otherwise, the subject
   will be provided using the -s option to MAIL_PROGRAM (if your mail
   program does not support the -s option, you must set
   MAIL_PROGRAM_SUBJECT_BODY to 1).  If your system uses sendmail, use
   the sendmail choice below.  Otherwise, select one of the other
   choices as appropriate.  */
#if 1
/* #define MAIL_PROGRAM "/usr/lib/sendmail -t" */
#define MAIL_PROGRAM "/usr/sbin/sendmail -t"
#define MAIL_PROGRAM_TO_BODY 1
#define MAIL_PROGRAM_SUBJECT_BODY 1
#endif
#if 0
#define MAIL_PROGRAM "/usr/ucb/mail"
#define MAIL_PROGRAM_TO_BODY 0
#define MAIL_PROGRAM_SUBJECT_BODY 0
#endif
#if 0
#define MAIL_PROGRAM "/bin/mail"
#define MAIL_PROGRAM_TO_BODY 0
#define MAIL_PROGRAM_SUBJECT_BODY 1
#endif

/* Set PS_PROGRAM to the program to run to get a process status,
   including the arguments to pass it.  This is used by ``uustat -p''.
   Set HAVE_PS_MULTIPLE to 1 if a comma separated list of process
   numbers may be appended (e.g. ``ps -flp1,10,100'').  Otherwise ps
   will be invoked several times, with a single process number append
   each time.  The default definitions should work on most systems,
   although some (such as the NeXT) will complain about the 'p'
   option; for those, use the second set of definitions.  The third
   set of definitions are appropriate for System V.  To use the second
   or third set of definitions, change the ``#if 1'' to ``#if 0'' and
   change the appropriate ``#if 0'' to ``#if 1''.  */
#if 1
#define PS_PROGRAM "/bin/ps -lp"
#define HAVE_PS_MULTIPLE 0
#endif
#if 0
#define PS_PROGRAM "/bin/ps -l"
#define HAVE_PS_MULTIPLE 0
#endif
#if 0
#define PS_PROGRAM "/bin/ps -flp"
#define HAVE_PS_MULTIPLE 1
#endif
#ifdef __QNX__
/* Use this for QNX, along with HAVE_QNX_LOCKFILES.  */
#undef PS_PROGRAM
#undef HAVE_PS_MULTIPLE
#define PS_PROGRAM "/bin/ps -l -n -p"
#define HAVE_PS_MULTIPLE 0
#endif

/* If you use other programs that also lock devices, such as cu or
   uugetty, the other programs and UUCP must agree on whether a device
   is locked.  This is typically done by creating a lock file in a
   specific directory; the lock files are generally named
   LCK..something or LK.something.  If the LOCKDIR macro is defined,
   these lock files will be placed in the named directory; otherwise
   they will be placed in the default spool directory.  On some HDB
   systems the lock files are placed in /etc/locks.  On some they are
   placed in /usr/spool/locks.  On the NeXT they are placed in
   /usr/spool/uucp/LCK.  */
/* #define LOCKDIR "/usr/spool/uucp" */
/* #define LOCKDIR "/etc/locks" */
/* #define LOCKDIR "/usr/spool/locks" */
/* #define LOCKDIR "/usr/spool/uucp/LCK" */
/* #define LOCKDIR "/var/spool/lock" */
/* #define LOCKDIR "/var/lock" */

/* You must also specify the format of the lock files by setting
   exactly one of the following macros to 1.  Check an existing lock
   file to decide which of these choices is more appropriate.

   The HDB style is to write the locking process ID in ASCII, passed
   to ten characters, followed by a newline.

   The V2 style is to write the locking process ID as four binary
   bytes in the host byte order.  Many BSD derived systems use this
   type of lock file, including the NeXT.

   SCO lock files are similar to HDB lock files, but always lock the
   lowercase version of the tty (i.e., LCK..tty2a is created if you
   are locking tty2A).  They are appropriate if you are using Taylor
   UUCP on an SCO Unix, SCO Xenix, or SCO Open Desktop system.

   SVR4 lock files are also similar to HDB lock files, but they use a
   different naming convention.  The filenames are LK.xxx.yyy.zzz,
   where xxx is the major device number of the device holding the
   special device file, yyy is the major device number of the port
   device itself, and zzz is the minor device number of the port
   device.

   Sequent DYNIX/ptx (but perhaps not Dynix 3.x) uses yet another
   naming convention.  The lock file for /dev/ttyXA/XAAP is named
   LCK..ttyXAAP.

   Coherent use a completely different method of terminal locking.
   See unix/cohtty for details.  For locks other than for terminals,
   HDB type lock files are used.

   QNX lock files are similar to HDB lock files except that the node
   ID must be stored in addition to the process ID and for serial
   devices the node ID must be included in the lock file name.  QNX
   boxes are generally used in bunches, and all of them behave like
   one big machine to some extent.  Thus, processes on different
   machines will be sharing the files in the spool directory.  To
   detect if a process has died and a lock is thus stale, you need the
   node ID of the process as well as the process ID.  The process ID
   is stored as a number written using ASCII digits padded to 10
   characters, followed by a space, followed by the node ID written
   using ASCII digits padded to 10 characters, followed by a newline.
   The format for QNX lock files was made up just for Taylor UUCP.
   QNX doesn't come with a version of UUCP.  */
#define HAVE_V2_LOCKFILES 0
#define HAVE_HDB_LOCKFILES 0
#define HAVE_SCO_LOCKFILES 0
#define HAVE_SVR4_LOCKFILES 0
#define HAVE_SEQUENT_LOCKFILES 0
#define HAVE_COHERENT_LOCKFILES 0
#define HAVE_QNX_LOCKFILES 0

/* This tries to pick a default based on preprocessor definitions.
   Ignore it if you have explicitly set one of the above values.  */
#if HAVE_V2_LOCKFILES + HAVE_HDB_LOCKFILES + HAVE_SCO_LOCKFILES + HAVE_SVR4_LOCKFILES + HAVE_SEQUENT_LOCKFILES + HAVE_COHERENT_LOCKFILES + HAVE_QNX_LOCKFILES == 0
#ifdef __QNX__
#undef HAVE_QNX_LOCKFILES
#define HAVE_QNX_LOCKFILES 1
#else /* ! defined (__QNX__) */
#ifdef __COHERENT__
#undef HAVE_COHERENT_LOCKFILES
#define HAVE_COHERENT_LOCKFILES 1
#else /* ! defined (__COHERENT__) */
#ifdef _SEQUENT_
#undef HAVE_SEQUENT_LOCKFILES
#define HAVE_SEQUENT_LOCKFILES 1
#else /* ! defined (_SEQUENT) */
#ifdef sco
#undef HAVE_SCO_LOCKFILES
#define HAVE_SCO_LOCKFILES 1
#else /* ! defined (sco) */
#ifdef __svr4__
#undef HAVE_SVR4_LOCKFILES
#define HAVE_SVR4_LOCKFILES 1
#else /* ! defined (__svr4__) */
/* Final default is HDB.  There's no way to tell V2 from HDB.  */
#undef HAVE_HDB_LOCKFILES
#define HAVE_HDB_LOCKFILES 1
#endif /* ! defined (__svr4__) */
#endif /* ! defined (sco) */
#endif /* ! defined (_SEQUENT) */
#endif /* ! defined (__COHERENT__) */
#endif /* ! defined (__QNX__) */
#endif /* no LOCKFILES define */

/* If your system supports Internet mail addresses (which look like
   user@host.domain rather than system!user), HAVE_INTERNET_MAIL
   should be set to 1.  This is checked by uuxqt and uustat when
   sending notifications to the person who submitted the job.

   If your system does not understand addresses of the form user@host,
   you must set HAVE_INTERNET_MAIL to 0.

   If your system does not understand addresses of the form host!user,
   which is unlikely, you must set HAVE_INTERNET_MAIL to 1.

   If your system sends mail addressed to "A!B@C" to host C (i.e., it
   parses the address as "(A!B)@C"), you must set HAVE_INTERNET_MAIL
   to 1.

   If your system sends mail addressed to "A!B@C" to host A (i.e., it
   parses the address as "A!(B@C)"), you must set HAVE_INTERNET_MAIL
   to 0.

   Note that in general it is best to avoid addresses of the form
   "A!B@C" because of this ambiguity of precedence.  UUCP will not
   intentionally generate addresses of this form, but it can occur in
   certain rather complex cases.  */
#define HAVE_INTERNET_MAIL 1

/* Adminstrative decisions.  */

/* Set USE_RCS_ID to 1 if you want the RCS ID strings compiled into
   the executable.  Leaving them out will decrease the executable
   size.  Leaving them in will make it easier to determine which
   version you are running.  */
#define USE_RCS_ID 1

/* DEBUG controls how much debugging information is compiled into the
   code.  If DEBUG is defined as 0, no sanity checks will be done and
   no debugging messages will be compiled in.  If DEBUG is defined as
   1 sanity checks will be done but there will still be no debugging
   messages.  If DEBUG is 2 than debugging messages will be compiled
   in.  When initially testing, DEBUG should be 2, and you should
   probably leave it at 2 unless a small reduction in the executable
   file size will be very helpful.  */
#define DEBUG 2

/* Set HAVE_ENCRYPTED_PASSWORDS to 1 if you want login passwords to be
   encrypted before comparing them against the values in the file.
   This only applies when uucico is run with the -l or -e switches and
   is doing its own login prompting.  Note that the passwords used are
   from the UUCP password file, not the system /etc/passwd file.  See
   the documentation for further details.  If you set this, you are
   responsible for encrypting the passwords in the UUCP password file.
   The function crypt will be used to do comparisons.  */
#define HAVE_ENCRYPTED_PASSWORDS 0

/* Set the default grade to use for a uucp command if the -g option is
   not used.  The grades, from highest to lowest, are 0 to 9, A to Z,
   a to z.  */
#define BDEFAULT_UUCP_GRADE ('N')

/* Set the default grade to use for a uux command if the -g option is
   not used.  */
#define BDEFAULT_UUX_GRADE ('N')

/* To compile in use of the new style of configuration files described
   in the documentation, set HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG to 1.  */
#define HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG 1

/* To compile in use of V2 style configuration files (L.sys, L-devices
   and so on), set HAVE_V2_CONFIG to 1.  To compile in use of HDB
   style configuration files (Systems, Devices and so on) set
   HAVE_HDB_CONFIG to 1.  The files will be looked up in the
   oldconfigdir directory as defined in the Makefile.

   You may set any or all of HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG, HAVE_V2_CONFIG and
   HAVE_HDB_CONFIG to 1 (you must set at least one of the macros).
   When looking something up (a system, a port, etc.) the new style
   configuration files will be read first, followed by the V2
   configuration files, followed by the HDB configuration files.  */
#define HAVE_V2_CONFIG 0
#define HAVE_HDB_CONFIG 0

/* Exactly one of the following macros must be set to 1.  The exact
   format of the spool directories is explained in unix/spool.c.

   SPOOLDIR_V2 -- Use a Version 2 (original UUCP) style spool directory
   SPOOLDIR_BSD42 -- Use a BSD 4.2 style spool directory
   SPOOLDIR_BSD43 -- Use a BSD 4.3 style spool directory
   SPOOLDIR_HDB -- Use a HDB (BNU) style spool directory
   SPOOLDIR_ULTRIX -- Use an Ultrix style spool directory
   SPOOLDIR_SVR4 -- Use a System V Release 4 spool directory
   SPOOLDIR_TAYLOR -- Use a new style spool directory

   If you are not worried about compatibility with a currently running
   UUCP, use SPOOLDIR_TAYLOR.  */
#define SPOOLDIR_V2 0
#define SPOOLDIR_BSD42 0
#define SPOOLDIR_BSD43 0
#define SPOOLDIR_HDB 0
#define SPOOLDIR_ULTRIX 0
#define SPOOLDIR_SVR4 0
#define SPOOLDIR_TAYLOR 1

/* The status file generated by UUCP can use either the traditional
   HDB upper case comments or new easier to read lower case comments.
   This affects the display of uustat -m or uustat -q.  Some
   third-party programs read these status files and expect them to be
   in a certain format.  The default is to use the traditional
   comments when using an HDB or SVR4 spool directory, and to use
   lower case comments otherwise.  */
#define USE_TRADITIONAL_STATUS (SPOOLDIR_HDB || SPOOLDIR_SVR4)

/* You must select which type of logging you want by setting exactly
   one of the following to 1.  These control output to the log file
   and to the statistics file.

   If you define HAVE_TAYLOR_LOGGING, each line in the log file will
   look something like this:

   uucico uunet uucp (1991-12-10 09:04:34.45 16390) Receiving uunet/D./D.uunetSwJ72

   and each line in the statistics file will look something like this:

   uucp uunet (1991-12-10 09:04:40.20) received 2371 bytes in 5 seconds (474 bytes/sec)

   If you define HAVE_V2_LOGGING, each line in the log file will look
   something like this:

   uucico uunet uucp (12/10-09:04 16390) Receiving uunet/D./D.uunetSwJ72

   and each line in the statistics file will look something like this:

   uucp uunet (12/10-09:04 16390) (692373862) received data 2371 bytes 5 seconds

   If you define HAVE_HDB_LOGGING, each program will by default use a
   separate log file.  For uucico talking to uunet, for example, it
   will be /usr/spool/uucp/.Log/uucico/uunet.  Each line will look
   something like this:

   uucp uunet (12/10-09:04:22,16390,1) Receiving uunet/D./D.uunetSwJ72

   and each line in the statistics file will look something like this:

   uunet!uucp M (12/10-09:04:22) (C,16390,1) [ttyXX] <- 2371 / 5.000 secs, 474 bytes/sec

   The main reason to prefer one format over another is that you may
   have shell scripts which expect the files to have a particular
   format.  If you have none, choose whichever format you find more
   appealing.  */
#define HAVE_TAYLOR_LOGGING 1
#define HAVE_V2_LOGGING 0
#define HAVE_HDB_LOGGING 0

/* If QNX_LOG_NODE_ID is set to 1, log messages will include the QNX
   node ID just after the process ID.  This is a policy decision
   because it changes the log file entry format, which can break other
   programs (e.g., some of the ones in the contrib directory) which
   expect to read the standard log file format.  */
#ifdef __QNX__
#define QNX_LOG_NODE_ID 1
#else
#define QNX_LOG_NODE_ID 0
#endif

/* If LOG_DEVICE_PREFIX is 1, log messages will give the full
   pathname of a device rather than just the final component.  This is
   important because on QNX //2/dev/ser2 refers to a different device
   than //4/dev/ser2.  */
#ifdef __QNX__
#define LOG_DEVICE_PREFIX 1
#else
#define LOG_DEVICE_PREFIX 0
#endif

/* If you would like the log, debugging and statistics files to be
   closed after each message, set CLOSE_LOGFILES to 1.  This will
   permit the log files to be easily moved.  If a log file does not
   exist when a new message is written out, it will be created.
   Setting CLOSE_LOGFILES to 1 will obviously require slightly more
   processing time.  */
#define CLOSE_LOGFILES 1

/* The name of the default spool directory.  If HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG is
   set to 1, this may be overridden by the ``spool'' command in the
   configuration file.  */
/* #define SPOOLDIR "/usr/spool/uucp" */
#define SPOOLDIR "/var/spool/uucp"

/* The name of the default public directory.  If HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG is
   set to 1, this may be overridden by the ``pubdir'' command in the
   configuration file.  Also, a particular system may be given a
   specific public directory by using the ``pubdir'' command in the
   system file.  */
/* #define PUBDIR "/usr/spool/uucppublic" */
#define PUBDIR "/var/spool/uucp_pubdir"

/* The default command path.  This is a space separated list of
   directories.  Remote command executions requested by uux are looked
   up using this path.  If you are using HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG, the
   command path may be overridden for a particular system.  For most
   systems, you should just make sure that the programs rmail and
   rnews can be found using this path.  */
#define CMDPATH "/bin /usr/bin /usr/local/bin"

/* The default amount of free space to require for systems that do not
   specify an amount with the ``free-space'' command.  This is only
   used when talking to another instance of Taylor UUCP; if accepting
   a file would not leave at least this many bytes free on the disk,
   it will be refused.  */
#define DEFAULT_FREE_SPACE (50000)

/* While a file is being received, Taylor UUCP will periodically check
   to see if there is enough free space remaining on the disk.  If
   there is not enough space available on the disk (as determined by
   DEFAULT_FREE_SPACE, above, or the ``free-space'' command for the
   system) the communication will be aborted.  The disk will be
   checked each time FREE_SPACE_DELTA bytes are received.  Lower
   values of FREE_SPACE_DELTA are less likely to fill up the disk, but
   will also waste more time checking the amount of free space.  To
   avoid checking the disk while the file is being received, set
   FREE_SPACE_DELTA to 0.  */
#define FREE_SPACE_DELTA (10240)

/* It is possible for an execute job to request to be executed using
   sh(1), rather than execve(2).  This is such a security risk, it is
   being disabled by default; to allow such jobs, set the following
   macro to 1.  */
/* XXX needed to pass pipe tests */
#define ALLOW_SH_EXECUTION 1

/* If a command executed on behalf of a remote system takes a filename
   as an argument, a security breach may be possible (note that on my
   system neither of the default commands, rmail and rnews, take
   filename arguments).  If you set ALLOW_FILENAME_ARGUMENTS to 0, all
   arguments to a command will be checked; if any argument
   1) starts with ../
   2) contains the string /../
   3) begins with a / but does not name a file that may be sent or
      received (according to the specified ``remote-send'' and
      ``remote-receive'')
   the command will be rejected.  By default, any argument is
   permitted. */
#define ALLOW_FILENAME_ARGUMENTS 1

/* If you set FSYNC_ON_CLOSE to 1, all output files will be forced out
   to disk using the fsync system call when they are closed.  This can
   be useful if you can not afford to lose people's mail if the system
   crashes.  However, not all systems have the fsync call, and it is
   always less efficient to use it.  Note that some versions of SCO
   Unix, and possibly other systems, make fsync a synonym for sync,
   which is extremely inefficient.  */
#define FSYNC_ON_CLOSE 0

#if HAVE_TAYLOR_LOGGING

/* The default log file when using HAVE_TAYLOR_LOGGING.  When using
   HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG, this may be overridden by the ``logfile''
   command in the configuration file.  */
/* #define LOGFILE "/usr/spool/uucp/Log" */
/* #define LOGFILE "/var/spool/uucp/Log" */
#define LOGFILE "/var/log/uucp/Log"

/* The default statistics file when using HAVE_TAYLOR_LOGGING.  When
   using HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG, this may be overridden by the
   ``statfile'' command in the configuration file.  */
/* #define STATFILE "/usr/spool/uucp/Stats" */
/* #define STATFILE "/var/spool/uucp/Stats" */
#define STATFILE "/var/log/uucp/Stats"

/* The default debugging file when using HAVE_TAYLOR_LOGGING.  When
   using HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG, this may be overridden by the
   ``debugfile'' command in the configuration file.  */
/* #define DEBUGFILE "/usr/spool/uucp/Debug" */
/* #define DEBUGFILE "/var/spool/uucp/Debug" */
#define DEBUGFILE "/var/log/uucp/Debug"

#endif /* HAVE_TAYLOR_LOGGING */

#if HAVE_V2_LOGGING

/* The default log file when using HAVE_V2_LOGGING.  When using
   HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG, this may be overridden by the ``logfile''
   command in the configuration file.  */
#define LOGFILE "/usr/spool/uucp/LOGFILE"

/* The default statistics file when using HAVE_V2_LOGGING.  When using
   HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG, this may be overridden by the ``statfile''
   command in the configuration file.  */
#define STATFILE "/usr/spool/uucp/SYSLOG"

/* The default debugging file when using HAVE_V2_LOGGING.  When using
   HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG, this may be overridden by the ``debugfile''
   command in the configuration file.  */
#define DEBUGFILE "/usr/spool/uucp/DEBUG"

#endif /* HAVE_V2_LOGGING */

#if HAVE_HDB_LOGGING

/* The default log file when using HAVE_HDB_LOGGING.  When using
   HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG, this may be overridden by the ``logfile''
   command in the configuration file.  The first %s in the string will
   be replaced by the program name (e.g. uucico); the second %s will
   be replaced by the system name (if there is no appropriate system,
   "ANY" will be used).  No other '%' character may appear in the
   string.  */
#define LOGFILE "/usr/spool/uucp/.Log/%s/%s"

/* The default statistics file when using HAVE_HDB_LOGGING.  When using
   HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG, this may be overridden by the ``statfile''
   command in the configuration file.  */
#define STATFILE "/usr/spool/uucp/.Admin/xferstats"

/* The default debugging file when using HAVE_HDB_LOGGING.  When using
   HAVE_TAYLOR_CONFIG, this may be overridden by the ``debugfile''
   command in the configuration file.  */
#define DEBUGFILE "/usr/spool/uucp/.Admin/audit.local"

#endif /* HAVE_HDB_LOGGING */

/* This makes any ~ the same as pubdir, even for users that exist,
  needed for SuSv3 */
/* #define ALL_USERS_ARE_PUBDIR */

/* This causes any "file not found" errors from uucp to be soft, the next
  file is copied anyway */
#define CONTINUE_AFTER_FILE_NOT_FOUND

/* make any files placed in pubdir world writable, not a good idea, but
  it gets us past a test & lets me close PR-4080015 */
#define WORLD_WRITABLE_FILE_IN "/private/var/spool/uucp_pubdir"